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    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In this first lecture Dr. O’Donnell offers a brief history of target detection both prior to and after the adoption of radar. He discusses the scientific principles underlying radar detection. Descriptions of the various types of radar and radar classifications are also provided. Finally, he introduces the series and summarizes the topics to be covered. This first lecture is divided into four parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In this second lecture Dr. O’Donnell discusses the laws of electromagnetism (Coulomb, Gauss, Biot-Savart, Ampere and Faraday) which make up Maxwell’s equations. He also reviews time-varying electromagnetic waves. This lecture is divided into two parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, electromagnetism

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In this third lecture "Review of Signal Systems and Digital Signal Processing," Dr. O’Donnell discusses continuous signals and systems, sampled data and discrete time systems, the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). He concludes the lecture by reviewing finite impulse response (FIR) filters and the weighting of filters. This lecture is divided into four parts. Please note that audio is available for the first lecture segment only; the remaining segments features a slide review of this topic.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, signal systems, digital signal processing

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    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: May-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In this fourth lecture, Dr. O’Donnell provides an in depth discussion of the radar equation. He considers the surveillance and tracking forms of the radar equation as well as the radar equation for rain clutter. He also examines radar losses with specific examples. This lecture is divided into two parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, the radar equation

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In this fifth lecture, Dr. O’Donnell examines the propagation of radar signals through the atmosphere. Specifically he focuses on atmospheric refraction, over-the-horizon diffraction, atmospheric attenuation and ionospheric propagation. This lecture is divided into four parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, atmospheric propagation effects

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: May-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In this sixth lecture, Dr. O’Donnell explains the basic concepts involved in detecting signals in noise. He also reviews the integration of multiple pulses, fluctuating targets and setting an adaptive target detection threshold using a constant false alarm rate (CFAR). This lecture is divided into three parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, detection, signals, noise

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In this seventh lecture Dr. O’Donnell discusses the definition of radar cross section (RCS) and the factors determining RCS. He also considers the RCS of typical targets, the physical scattering mechanisms and contributors to the RCS of a target and finally how to predict a target’s radar cross section. This lecture is divided into seven segments.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, radar cross section

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his first lecture on antennas (and eighth lecture in the series on radar systems engineering), Dr. O’Donnell outlines antenna basics including field regions, electromagnetic field equations, polarization antenna directivity and gain and antenna input impedance. He concludes with a discussion of mechanical scanning antennas. This lecture is divided into four parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, detection, signals, noise

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his second lecture on antennas (and ninth lecture in the series on radar systems engineering), Dr. O’Donnell focuses on phased array antennas. He also discusses frequency scanning of antennas and hybrid methods of scanning. This lecture is divided into five parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, electronic scanning, hybrid scanning

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his tenth lecture, Dr. O’Donnell reviews radar clutter or backscatter from unwanted objects. He demonstrates how specific objects such as the ground or sea affect the performance of radar. This lecture is divided into seven segments.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, radar clutter

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his eleventh lecture, Dr. O’Donnell addresses radar waveforms and their properties. He also discusses the different types of pulse compression. This lecture is divided into four parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, detection, signals, noise

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his first lecture on clutter rejection techniques (and twelfth lecture in the series on radar systems engineering) Dr. O’Donnell reviews the impact of the digital revolution upon clutter rejection and Moving Target Indication (MTI) clutter cancellation techniques. This lecture is divided into three parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, clutter rejection, Moving Target Indication, MTI

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his second lecture on clutter rejection (and thirteenth lecture in the series on radar systems engineering), Dr. O’Donnell covers Doppler filtering and pulse Doppler processing techniques. This lecture is divided into four parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, clutter rejection, pulse doppler processing

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his fourteenth lecture Dr. O’Donnell considers different airborne radar missions and the types of airborne radars used (pulse Doppler radar and early warning and surveillance radars). Clutter is the main challenge in the airborne environment. This lecture is divided into four parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, airborne pulse doppler techniques

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his first lecture on parameter estimation and tracking (and fifteenth lecture in the series on radar systems engineering), Dr. O’Donnell focuses on radar parameters. He reviews the measurable radar observables and the parameters calculated based on these. Single target tracking is also discussed. This lecture is divided into three parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, parameter estimation and tracking

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his second lecture on parameter estimation and tracking (and sixteenth lecture in the series on radar systems engineering), Dr. O’Donnell provides an overview of the tracking process, the effect of correlated missed detections and correlated false alarms on tracking performance, track-before-detect-techniques and integrated multiple radar tracking. The lecture is divided into four parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, parameter estimation and tracking

  • Access Now

    Author: O'Donnell, Robert
    Sponsored by: IEEE Educational Activities and IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Society
    Tutorial Level: Advanced
    Publication Date: July-2012
    Run Time: 180:00

    Abstract

    The Radar Systems Engineering Series consists of seventeen lectures; each lecture is offered as an individual tutorial. The goal of this series is to provide an advanced introduction to radar systems subsystem issues for first year graduate students, advanced senior undergraduates or professionals new to the field. The material will be most accessible to university graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science / Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and who have a solid understanding of Electromagnetism and their fields, Probability, and Calculus through Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra.

    Each tutorial consists of a screen-captured PowerPoint lecture narrated by Dr. O’Donnell. In each tutorial Dr. O’Donnell has broken his lecture into one or more separate segments for ease of viewing. All of the material in these tutorials is subject to copyright laws. In the first segment of this lecture Dr. O'Donnell reviews the specific copyright information for these materials. Following this brief video, the first segment of this lecture will begin.

    In his seventeenth lecture Dr. O’Donnell reviews transmitters (high power tube amplifiers and solid state RF power amplifiers), receivers and waveform generators, other transmitter/receiver subsystems and radar receiver-transmitter architectures. This lecture is divided into five parts.

    Key words: radar, radar engineering, transmitters, receivers